An Audience with Martin Bell - War and the Death of the News

Since being offered the post of Grade B Reporter by the BBC in 1964, Martin Bell has spent more than half a century in the unquiet corners of the world, including four years in the surrogate war zone of the House of Commons. From Vietnam to Bosnia and beyond, the former BBC correspondent has been in the thick of it and has witnessed most of the wars of a turbulent half century.

His conclusions in his new book War and the Death of News are first hand and personal. He draws on his memories as a soldier and journalist, his broadcast reports, his notebooks and diaries, and original documents that he extracted from the war zones. He writes of the pity of war and (usually) its futility; of the failures that occur when armed force is chosen by politicians who have had, themselves, no experience of it; of the complex and ever-changing relationship between the media and the military; of the dangerous disregard of the lessons of history; of attempts to establish a system of international justice; of wars of religion and climate change; of truth and falsehood in news reporting; of the hazards of the 24/7 news cycle; of a TV news that, being no longer an eyewitness, censors the real world violence and peers across frontiers with the help of unverifiable videos. And of a journalism in retreat – the Death of News.
 
PLUS a post-talk Q&A session.

This event is in the Main Auditorium - Tickets are £17/£15 concessions